ScienceDaily News Feeds

  • How statistics can aid in the fight against misinformation
    on December 2, 2021 at 9:21 pm

    Mathematicians created a statistical model that can be used to detect misinformation in social posts.

  • How statistics can aid in the fight against misinformation
    on December 2, 2021 at 9:21 pm

    Mathematicians created a statistical model that can be used to detect misinformation in social posts.

  • How statistics can aid in the fight against misinformation
    on December 2, 2021 at 9:21 pm

    Mathematicians created a statistical model that can be used to detect misinformation in social posts.

  • Predicting protein-protein interactions
    on December 2, 2021 at 7:15 pm

    Scientists have collaborated to build a structurally-motivated deep learning method built from recent advances in neural language modeling. The team’s deep-learning model, called D-SCRIPT, was able to predict protein-protein interactions (PPIs) from primary amino acid sequences.

  • Which role models are best for STEM? Researchers offer recommendations in new analysis
    on December 2, 2021 at 1:39 am

    An analysis of the effect role models have on students’ motivation in studying STEM subjects points to new ways to deploy these leaders in order to encourage learning across different populations.

  • Machine learning helps mathematicians make new connections
    on December 1, 2021 at 4:19 pm

    Mathematicians have partnered with artificial intelligence to suggest and prove new mathematical theorems.

  • Machine learning helps mathematicians make new connections
    on December 1, 2021 at 4:19 pm

    Mathematicians have partnered with artificial intelligence to suggest and prove new mathematical theorems.

  • Constraining quantum measurement
    on November 30, 2021 at 3:14 pm

    The quantum world and our everyday world are very different places. Physicists now investigate how the act of measuring a quantum particle transforms it into an everyday object.

  • Artificial intelligence that understands object relationships
    on November 29, 2021 at 8:51 pm

    Researchers developed a machine learning model that understands the underlying relationships between objects in a scene and can generate accurate images of scenes from text descriptions.

  • How molecular clusters in the nucleus interact with chromosomes
    on November 24, 2021 at 8:41 pm

    Using computer simulations, chemists have discovered how nuclear bodies called nucleoli interact with chromosomes in the nucleus, and how those interactions help the nucleoli exist as stable droplets within the nucleus.

  • AI used to optimize several flow battery properties simultaneously
    on November 23, 2021 at 9:28 pm

    To find the right battery molecules, researchers have turned to the power of artificial intelligence to search through a vast chemical space of over a million molecules and optimize for several properties.

  • Social stress key to population’s rate of COVID-19 infection, study finds
    on November 23, 2021 at 6:13 pm

    Mathematicians have analysed global COVID-19 data to identify two constants which can drastically change a country’s rate of infection.

  • Exploding and weeping ceramics provide path to new shape-shifting material
    on November 18, 2021 at 2:15 am

    Researchers have discovered a path that could lead to shape-shifting ceramic materials. This discovery could improve everything from medical devices to electronics.

  • Artificial intelligence successfully predicts protein interactions
    on November 16, 2021 at 10:51 pm

    Researchers used artificial intelligence (AI) and evolutionary analysis to produce 3D models of eukaryotic protein interactions. The study identified more than 100 probable protein complexes for the first time and provided structural models for more than 700 previously uncharacterized ones. Insights into the ways pairs or groups of proteins fit together to carry out cellular processes could lead to a wealth of new drug targets.

  • Neuroscientists explore mysterious ‘events’ in the brain that open new avenues for understanding brain injuries and disorders
    on November 16, 2021 at 8:23 pm

    Using a new model of brain activity, computational neuroscientists are exploring striking bursts of activity in the human brain that have not been examined before. These bursts may have potential to serve as biomarkers for brain disease and conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, dementia, and ADHD.

  • Game theory and economics show how to steer evolution in a better direction
    on November 16, 2021 at 7:48 pm

    Human behavior drives the evolution of biological organisms in ways that can profoundly adversely impact human welfare. Understanding people’s incentives when they do so is essential to identify policies and other strategies to improve evolutionary outcomes. In a new study, researchers bring the tools of economics and game theory to evolution management.

  • Game theory and economics show how to steer evolution in a better direction
    on November 16, 2021 at 7:48 pm

    Human behavior drives the evolution of biological organisms in ways that can profoundly adversely impact human welfare. Understanding people’s incentives when they do so is essential to identify policies and other strategies to improve evolutionary outcomes. In a new study, researchers bring the tools of economics and game theory to evolution management.

  • Mathematicians derive the formulas for boundary layer turbulence 100 years after the phenomenon was first formulated
    on November 16, 2021 at 6:17 pm

    Turbulence makes many people uneasy or downright queasy. And it’s given researchers a headache, too. Mathematicians have been trying for a century or more to understand the turbulence that arises when a flow interacts with a boundary, but a formulation has proven elusive.

  • Mathematicians derive the formulas for boundary layer turbulence 100 years after the phenomenon was first formulated
    on November 16, 2021 at 6:17 pm

    Turbulence makes many people uneasy or downright queasy. And it’s given researchers a headache, too. Mathematicians have been trying for a century or more to understand the turbulence that arises when a flow interacts with a boundary, but a formulation has proven elusive.

  • Big data privacy for machine learning just got 100 times cheaper
    on November 16, 2021 at 3:31 pm

    Computer scientists have discovered an inexpensive way for tech companies to implement a rigorous form of personal data privacy when using or sharing large databases for machine learning.

  • AI helps design the perfect chickpea
    on November 11, 2021 at 8:43 pm

    A massive international research effort has led to development of a genetic model for the ‘ultimate’ chickpea, with the potential to lift crop yields by up to 12 per cent.

  • First quantum simulation of baryons
    on November 11, 2021 at 6:03 pm

    Researchers performed the first-ever simulation of baryons — fundamental quantum particles — on a quantum computer.

  • New computer model is a key step toward low-temperature preservation of 3D tissues, organs
    on November 10, 2021 at 3:46 pm

    Medical science is a key step closer to the cryopreservation of brain slices used in neurological research, pancreatic cells for the treatment of diabetes and even whole organs thanks to a new computer model that predicts how tissue’s size will change during the preservation process.

  • AI behind deepfakes may power materials design innovations
    on November 9, 2021 at 5:05 pm

    The person staring back from the computer screen may not actually exist, thanks to artificial intelligence (AI) capable of generating convincing but ultimately fake images of human faces. Now this same technology may power the next wave of innovations in materials design, according to scientists.

  • Giving robots social skills
    on November 4, 2021 at 8:26 pm

    Researchers have developed a control framework that enables robots to understand what it means to help or hinder one another and incorporate social reasoning into the tasks they are accomplishing.

  • When is a basin of attraction like an octopus?
    on November 4, 2021 at 3:53 pm

    In dynamical systems research, a ‘basin of attraction’ is the set of all the starting points — usually close to one another — that arrive at the same final state as the system evolves through time. The researchers describe a simple argument showing why basins in systems with multiple attractors should look like high-dimensional octopi.

  • Key to resilient energy-efficient AI/machine learning may reside in human brain
    on November 1, 2021 at 2:48 pm

    A clearer understanding of how a type of brain cell known as astrocytes function and can be emulated in the physics of hardware devices, may result in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning that autonomously self-repairs and consumes much less energy than the technologies currently do, according to researchers.

  • A mathematical model to help optimize vaccine development
    on October 27, 2021 at 5:49 pm

    Scientists are using a mathematical model to better understand the immune response to vaccines.

  • A mathematical model to help optimize vaccine development
    on October 27, 2021 at 5:49 pm

    Scientists are using a mathematical model to better understand the immune response to vaccines.

  • Modeling improvements promise increased accuracy for epidemic forecasting
    on October 26, 2021 at 4:42 pm

    Accurate forecasting of epidemic scenarios is critical to implementing effective public health intervention policies. Researchers used dynamical stochastic modeling techniques to reveal that infection and recovery rate fluctuations play a critical role in determining peak times for epidemics. Using a susceptible-infected-recovered epidemic model that incorporates daily fluctuations on control parameters, the study applies probability theory calculations to infection counts at the beginning of an epidemic wave and at peak times for populations in Italy.

  • New strategy for detecting non-conformist particles called anyons
    on October 26, 2021 at 1:43 pm

    By observing how strange particles called anyons dissipate heat, researchers have shown that they can probe the properties of these particles in systems that could be relevant for topological quantum computing.

  • Artificial intelligence sheds light on how the brain processes language
    on October 25, 2021 at 9:20 pm

    New research suggests the underlying function of ‘next-word prediction’ computational models closely resembles the function of language-processing centers in the human brain.

  • Superconductivity: New tricks for finding better materials
    on October 25, 2021 at 2:17 pm

    Two years ago, a new class of promising superconductors was discovered: so-called layered nickelates. For the first time a theoretical model is now available that can be used to understand the electronic mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity in these materials.

  • Machine learning can be fair and accurate
    on October 20, 2021 at 6:00 pm

    Researchers are challenging a long-held assumption that there is a trade-off between accuracy and fairness when using machine learning to make public policy decisions.

  • AI helping to quantify enzyme activity
    on October 20, 2021 at 2:32 am

    Enzymes are biological catalysts that facilitate biochemical transformations. An international team of bioinformatics researchers has developed a new process for predicting Michaelis constants, which determine reaction kinetics.

  • COVID-19 vaccination strategies: When is one dose better than two?
    on October 19, 2021 at 4:01 pm

    While most of the COVID-19 vaccines are designed as a two-dose regimen, some countries have prioritized vaccinating as many people as possible with a single dose before giving out an additional dose. In a new study, researchers illustrate the conditions under which a “prime first” vaccine campaign is most effective at stopping the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The team found the vaccine waning rate to be a critically important factor in the decision.

  • Targeted interventions to contain pandemics, minimize societal disruption
    on October 19, 2021 at 4:01 pm

    Nonpharmaceutical interventions, such as isolation, quarantines, and lockdowns, have been implemented in an effort to contain the pandemic, but these are often disruptive and costly. In a new article, researchers identify new and sustainable interventions to contain outbreaks while minimizing the economic and social costs. They built a data-driven mobility model to simulate COVID-19 spreading in Hong Kong, by combining synthetic population, human behavior patterns, and a viral transmission model, and found that by controlling a small percentage of grids, the virus could be largely contained.

  • New model points to solution to global blood shortage
    on October 19, 2021 at 3:05 pm

    A mathematical model of the body’s interacting physiological and biochemical processes shows that it may be more effective to replace red blood cell transfusion with transfusion of other fluids that are far less in demand.

  • New model points to solution to global blood shortage
    on October 19, 2021 at 3:05 pm

    A mathematical model of the body’s interacting physiological and biochemical processes shows that it may be more effective to replace red blood cell transfusion with transfusion of other fluids that are far less in demand.

  • Using quantum Parrondo’s random walks for encryption
    on October 15, 2021 at 1:48 pm

    SUTD has set out to apply concepts from quantum Parrondo’s paradox in search of a working protocol for semiclassical encryption.

  • Disease outbreak simulations reveal influence of ‘seeding’ by multiple infected people
    on October 14, 2021 at 6:19 pm

    A new computational analysis suggests that, beyond the initial effect of one infected person arriving and spreading disease to a previously uninfected population, the continuous arrival of more infected individuals has a significant influence on the evolution and severity of the local outbreak.

  • Toward more energy efficient power converters
    on October 12, 2021 at 3:23 pm

    Researchers extend the mathematical approach called automatic differentiation from machine learning to the fitting of model parameters that describe the behavior of field-effect transistors. This allowed the parameters to be extracted up to 3.5 times faster compared with previous methods, which may lead to more sustainable microelectronics.

  • Toward more energy efficient power converters
    on October 12, 2021 at 3:23 pm

    Researchers extend the mathematical approach called automatic differentiation from machine learning to the fitting of model parameters that describe the behavior of field-effect transistors. This allowed the parameters to be extracted up to 3.5 times faster compared with previous methods, which may lead to more sustainable microelectronics.

  • Physics meets democracy in this modeling study
    on October 8, 2021 at 2:57 pm

    A study leverages concepts from physics to model how campaign strategies influence the opinions of an electorate in a two-party system.

  • Physics meets democracy in this modeling study
    on October 8, 2021 at 2:57 pm

    A study leverages concepts from physics to model how campaign strategies influence the opinions of an electorate in a two-party system.

  • Getting up to speed on the proton
    on October 6, 2021 at 8:01 pm

    A century ago, scientists first detected the proton in the atomic nucleus. Yet, much about its contents remains a mystery. Scientists report a new theory for understanding what’s inside protons moving at the speed of light.

  • Calculating the path of cancer
    on October 4, 2021 at 6:03 pm

    Scientists are using a new mathematical tool to predict how combinations of genetic mutations cause different types of tumors.

  • Calculating the path of cancer
    on October 4, 2021 at 6:03 pm

    Scientists are using a new mathematical tool to predict how combinations of genetic mutations cause different types of tumors.

  • Calculating the path of cancer
    on October 4, 2021 at 6:03 pm

    Scientists are using a new mathematical tool to predict how combinations of genetic mutations cause different types of tumors.

  • How apples get their shapes
    on October 4, 2021 at 3:51 pm

    How do apples grow that distinctive shape? Now, a team of mathematicians and physicists have used observations, lab experiments, theory and computation to understand the growth and form of the cusp of an apple.

  • How a committed minority can change society
    on September 30, 2021 at 2:14 pm

    How do social conventions change? Robotic engineers and marketing scientists joined forces to study this phenomenon, combining online experiments and statistical analysis into a mathematical model that shows how a committed minority can influence the majority to overturn long-standing practices.

  • Great apes’ consonant and vowel-like sounds travel over distance without losing meaning
    on September 28, 2021 at 11:38 pm

    Scientists have shown that orangutan call signals believed to be closest to the precursors to human language, travel through forest over long distances without losing their meaning. This throws into question the accepted mathematical model on the evolution of human speech.

  • Great apes’ consonant and vowel-like sounds travel over distance without losing meaning
    on September 28, 2021 at 11:38 pm

    Scientists have shown that orangutan call signals believed to be closest to the precursors to human language, travel through forest over long distances without losing their meaning. This throws into question the accepted mathematical model on the evolution of human speech.

  • Creating order by mechanical deformation in dense active matter
    on September 27, 2021 at 9:29 pm

    Living or biological systems cannot be easily understood using the standard laws of physics, such as thermodynamics, as scientists would for gases, liquids or solids. Living systems are active, demonstrating fascinating properties such as adapting to their environment or repairing themselves. Exploring the questions posed by living systems using computer simulations, researchers have now discovered a novel type of ordering effect generated and sustained by a simple mechanical deformation, specifically steady shear.

  • Mathematical constructions of COVID virus activity could provide new insight for vaccines, treatment
    on September 23, 2021 at 2:21 pm

    Mathematical constructions of the action of SARS-CoV-2 and its multiple spikes, which enable its success at infecting cells, can give vaccine developers and pharmaceutical companies alike a more precise picture of what the virus is doing inside us and help fine tune prevention and treatment.

  • Mathematical constructions of COVID virus activity could provide new insight for vaccines, treatment
    on September 23, 2021 at 2:21 pm

    Mathematical constructions of the action of SARS-CoV-2 and its multiple spikes, which enable its success at infecting cells, can give vaccine developers and pharmaceutical companies alike a more precise picture of what the virus is doing inside us and help fine tune prevention and treatment.

  • Contact-tracing apps could improve vaccination strategies
    on September 22, 2021 at 6:32 pm

    Mathematical modeling of disease spread suggests that herd immunity could be achieved with fewer vaccine doses by using Bluetooth-based contact-tracing apps to identify people who have more exposure to others — and targeting them for vaccination.

  • Contact-tracing apps could improve vaccination strategies
    on September 22, 2021 at 6:32 pm

    Mathematical modeling of disease spread suggests that herd immunity could be achieved with fewer vaccine doses by using Bluetooth-based contact-tracing apps to identify people who have more exposure to others — and targeting them for vaccination.

  • Contact-tracing apps could improve vaccination strategies
    on September 22, 2021 at 6:32 pm

    Mathematical modeling of disease spread suggests that herd immunity could be achieved with fewer vaccine doses by using Bluetooth-based contact-tracing apps to identify people who have more exposure to others — and targeting them for vaccination.

  • Finding new alloys just became simpler
    on September 16, 2021 at 6:27 pm

    In metal alloys, behavior at the atomic scale affects the material’s properties. However, the number of possible alloys is astronomical. Scientists developed a theoretical model that allows him to rapidly determine the strength of millions of different alloys at high temperatures.

  • A statistical fix for archaeology’s dating problem
    on September 15, 2021 at 8:14 pm

    Archaeologists have long had a dating problem. The radiocarbon analysis typically used to reconstruct past human demographic changes relies on a method easily skewed by radiocarbon calibration curves and measurement uncertainty. And there’s never been a statistical fix that works — until now.

  • Using artificial intelligence to predict COVID patients’ oxygen needs
    on September 15, 2021 at 5:51 pm

    Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge along with 20 other hospitals from across the world and healthcare technology leader, NVIDIA, have used artificial intelligence (AI) to predict COVID patients’ oxygen needs on a global scale.

  • Scientists develop ‘optimal strategies’ computer model that could significantly reduce future COVID-19 infections and deaths
    on September 15, 2021 at 5:46 pm

    Scientists have developed a predictive computer model that, when tested on real pandemic data, proposed strategies that would have reduced the rate of both COVID-19 infections and deaths by an average of 72 per cent, based on a sample from four countries.

  • New ocean temperature data help scientists make their hot predictions
    on September 14, 2021 at 2:00 pm

    So many climate models, so little time … A new way of measuring ocean temperatures helps scientists sort the likely from unlikely scenarios of global warming.

  • After 20 years of trying, scientists succeed in doping a 1D chain of cuprates
    on September 9, 2021 at 8:22 pm

    After 20 years of trying, scientists doped a 1D copper oxide chain and found a surprisingly strong attraction between electrons that may factor into the material’s superconducting powers.

  • New ways to improve the science of ‘trade-offs’
    on September 9, 2021 at 4:40 pm

    Researchers working on complicated problems in agriculture, ecology and medicine have developed a mathematical model to enable faster solutions.

  • New ways to improve the science of ‘trade-offs’
    on September 9, 2021 at 4:40 pm

    Researchers working on complicated problems in agriculture, ecology and medicine have developed a mathematical model to enable faster solutions.

  • New AI algorithm to improve brain stimulation devices to treat disease
    on September 4, 2021 at 2:01 am

    For millions of people with epilepsy and movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, electrical stimulation of the brain already is widening treatment possibilities. In the future, electrical stimulation may help people with psychiatric illness and direct brain injuries, such as stroke.

  • Optimal lifting of COVID-19 restrictions would follow pace of vaccination, study suggests
    on September 2, 2021 at 9:47 pm

    A new analysis suggests that, in order to boost freedoms and protect against overwhelming new waves of COVID-19, the pace at which restrictions to reduce spread are lifted must be directly tied to the pace of vaccination.

  • Exploring the past: Computational models shed new light on the evolution of prehistoric languages
    on August 31, 2021 at 5:13 pm

    A new linguistic study sheds light on the nature of languages spoken before the written period, using computational modeling to reconstruct the grammar of the 6500-7000 year-old Proto-Indo-European language.

  • Standards for studies using machine learning
    on August 30, 2021 at 8:39 pm

    Researchers in the life sciences who use machine learning for their studies should adopt standards that allow other researchers to reproduce their results, according to a new article.

  • New mathematical solutions to an old problem in astronomy
    on August 30, 2021 at 4:32 pm

    The Bernese theoretical astrophysicist Kevin Heng has achieved a rare feat: On paper, he has derived novel solutions to an old mathematical problem needed to calculate light reflections from planets and moons. Now, data can be interpreted in a simple way to understand planetary atmospheres, for example. The new formulae will likely be incorporated into future textbooks.

  • New mathematical solutions to an old problem in astronomy
    on August 30, 2021 at 4:32 pm

    The Bernese theoretical astrophysicist Kevin Heng has achieved a rare feat: On paper, he has derived novel solutions to an old mathematical problem needed to calculate light reflections from planets and moons. Now, data can be interpreted in a simple way to understand planetary atmospheres, for example. The new formulae will likely be incorporated into future textbooks.

  • A universal equation for the shape of an egg
    on August 27, 2021 at 5:37 pm

    Researchers have discovered a universal mathematical formula that can describe any bird’s egg existing in nature — a significant step in understanding not only the egg shape itself, but also how and why it evolved, thus making widespread biological and technological applications possible.

  • A universal equation for the shape of an egg
    on August 27, 2021 at 5:37 pm

    Researchers have discovered a universal mathematical formula that can describe any bird’s egg existing in nature — a significant step in understanding not only the egg shape itself, but also how and why it evolved, thus making widespread biological and technological applications possible.

  • A new model for group decision-making shows how ‘followers’ can influence the outcome
    on August 26, 2021 at 9:02 pm

    From small committees to national elections, group decision-making can be complicated — and it may not always settle on the best choice. That’s partly because some members of the group do research on their own, and others take their cues from the people around them. A new mathematical framework predicts that decision-making groups have a critical threshold of people who get their information from others. Below that threshold, the group chooses the high-quality outcome. Above it, the group can end up choosing the better or worse option.

  • A new model for group decision-making shows how ‘followers’ can influence the outcome
    on August 26, 2021 at 9:02 pm

    From small committees to national elections, group decision-making can be complicated — and it may not always settle on the best choice. That’s partly because some members of the group do research on their own, and others take their cues from the people around them. A new mathematical framework predicts that decision-making groups have a critical threshold of people who get their information from others. Below that threshold, the group chooses the high-quality outcome. Above it, the group can end up choosing the better or worse option.

  • Robot mimics the powerful punch of the mantis shrimp
    on August 25, 2021 at 7:37 pm

    Mantis shrimp pack the strongest punch of any creature in the animal kingdom. How mantis shrimp produce these deadly, ultra-fast movements has long fascinated biologists. Now, an interdisciplinary team of roboticists, engineers and biologists have modeled the mechanics of the mantis shrimp’s punch and built a robot that mimics the movement. The research sheds light on the biology of these pugnacious crustaceans and paves the way for small but mighty robotic devices.

  • Robot mimics the powerful punch of the mantis shrimp
    on August 25, 2021 at 7:37 pm

    Mantis shrimp pack the strongest punch of any creature in the animal kingdom. How mantis shrimp produce these deadly, ultra-fast movements has long fascinated biologists. Now, an interdisciplinary team of roboticists, engineers and biologists have modeled the mechanics of the mantis shrimp’s punch and built a robot that mimics the movement. The research sheds light on the biology of these pugnacious crustaceans and paves the way for small but mighty robotic devices.

  • Mathematicians build an algorithm to ‘do the twist’
    on August 23, 2021 at 9:01 pm

    Mathematicians have developed an algorithm to decipher the rotational dynamics of twisting particles in large complex systems from the X-ray scattering patterns observed in X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments.

  • Mathematicians build an algorithm to ‘do the twist’
    on August 23, 2021 at 9:01 pm

    Mathematicians have developed an algorithm to decipher the rotational dynamics of twisting particles in large complex systems from the X-ray scattering patterns observed in X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments.

  • Statistics say large pandemics are more likely than we thought
    on August 23, 2021 at 7:10 pm

    The COVID-19 pandemic may be the deadliest viral outbreak the world has seen in more than a century. But statistically, such extreme events aren’t as rare as we may think, asserts a new analysis of novel disease outbreaks over the past 400 years. A newly assembled record of past outbreaks was used to estimate the probability of a pandemic with similar impact to COVID-19 is about 2 percent in any year. And that probability is growing.

  • Mathematical model predicts best way to build muscle
    on August 23, 2021 at 4:57 pm

    Researchers have developed a mathematical model that can predict the optimum exercise regime for building muscle.

  • From mathematics to medicine: Applying complex mathematics to analyze fMRI data
    on August 18, 2021 at 5:52 pm

    Mathematical research is aiding in the analysis of fMRI data. fMRI is the preeminent class of signals collected from the brain in vivo and is irreplaceable in the study of brain dysfunction in many medical fields, including psychiatry, neurology and pediatrics.

  • A mobility-based approach to optimize pandemic lockdown strategies
    on August 12, 2021 at 6:50 pm

    A new strategy for modeling the spread of COVID-19 incorporates smartphone-captured data on people’s movements and shows promise for aiding development of optimal lockdown policies.

  • Deep learning model classifies brain tumors with single MRI scan
    on August 11, 2021 at 2:08 pm

    A team of researchers have developed a deep learning model that is capable of classifying a brain tumor as one of six common types using a single 3D MRI scan, according to a new study.

  • Unlocking the AI algorithm ‘black box’ – new machine learning technology to find out what makes plants and humans tick
    on August 9, 2021 at 6:40 pm

    We all have an internal clock but what makes us tick? Scientists have developed new artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) technology to understand how gene expression regulates an organism’s circadian clock.

  • Neural network model shows why people with autism read facial expressions differently
    on August 5, 2021 at 3:54 pm

    People with autism spectrum disorder interpret facial expressions differently. Researchers have revealed more about how this comes to be. They induced abnormalities into a neural network model to explore the effects on the brain’s learning development.

  • ‘Triple contagion’: How fears influence coronavirus transmission
    on August 4, 2021 at 4:36 pm

    A new mathematical model for predicting infectious disease outbreaks incorporates fear — both of disease and of vaccines — to better understand how pandemics can occur in multiple waves of infections, like those we are seeing with COVID-19.

  • ‘Triple contagion’: How fears influence coronavirus transmission
    on August 4, 2021 at 4:36 pm

    A new mathematical model for predicting infectious disease outbreaks incorporates fear — both of disease and of vaccines — to better understand how pandemics can occur in multiple waves of infections, like those we are seeing with COVID-19.

  • Mathematician reveals world’s oldest example of applied geometry
    on August 4, 2021 at 4:35 pm

    A scientist has revealed that an ancient clay tablet could be the oldest and most complete example of applied geometry. The surveyor’s field plan from the Old Babylon period shows that ancient mathematics was more advanced than previously thought.

  • Mathematician reveals world’s oldest example of applied geometry
    on August 4, 2021 at 4:35 pm

    A scientist has revealed that an ancient clay tablet could be the oldest and most complete example of applied geometry. The surveyor’s field plan from the Old Babylon period shows that ancient mathematics was more advanced than previously thought.

  • Connective issue: AI learns by doing more with less
    on August 3, 2021 at 9:52 pm

    New research reveals constraints can lead to learning in AI systems.

  • Exoskeletons have a problem: They can strain the brain
    on July 21, 2021 at 9:26 pm

    Exoskeletons – wearable devices used by workers on assembly lines or in warehouses to alleviate stress on their lower backs – may compete with valuable resources in the brain while people work, canceling out the physical benefits of wearing them, a new study suggests.

  • New framework applies machine learning to atomistic modeling
    on July 21, 2021 at 9:26 pm

    A new method could lead to more accurate predictions of how new materials behave at the atomic scale.

  • Novel method predicts if COVID-19 clinical trials will fail or succeed
    on July 21, 2021 at 2:23 pm

    Researchers have modeled COVID-19 completion versus cessation in clinical trials using machine learning algorithms and ensemble learning.

  • Cancer: Information theory to fight resistance to treatments
    on July 21, 2021 at 2:22 pm

    A major challenge in cancer therapy is the adaptive response of cancer cells to targeted therapies. Although this adaptive response is theoretically reversible, such a reversal is hampered by numerous molecular mechanisms that allow the cancer cells to adapt to the treatment. A team has used information theory, in order to objectify in vivo the molecular regulations at play in the mechanisms of the adaptive response and their modulation by a therapeutic combination.

  • Cancer: Information theory to fight resistance to treatments
    on July 21, 2021 at 2:22 pm

    A major challenge in cancer therapy is the adaptive response of cancer cells to targeted therapies. Although this adaptive response is theoretically reversible, such a reversal is hampered by numerous molecular mechanisms that allow the cancer cells to adapt to the treatment. A team has used information theory, in order to objectify in vivo the molecular regulations at play in the mechanisms of the adaptive response and their modulation by a therapeutic combination.

  • The mathematics of repulsion for new graphene catalysts
    on July 19, 2021 at 2:31 pm

    Scientists at Tohoku University and colleagues in Japan have developed a mathematical model that helps predict the tiny changes in carbon-based materials that could yield interesting properties.

  • Mathematical models and computer simulations are the new frontiers in COVID-19 drug trials
    on July 19, 2021 at 2:30 pm

    Researchers are using computer models to simulate COVID-19 infections on a cellular level which allows for virtual trials of drugs and vaccines, opening the possibility of pre-assessment for drug and vaccine efficacy against the virus.

  • Mathematical model predicts the movement of microplastics in the ocean
    on July 13, 2021 at 3:08 pm

    New research has identified the processes that underpin the trajectories of microplastics below the ocean surface. The authors analyzed how biofouling — the accumulation of algae on the surface of microplastics — impacts the vertical movement of buoyant particles.

  • Mathematicians develop ground-breaking modeling toolkit to predict local COVID-19 impact
    on July 12, 2021 at 4:21 pm

    Mathematicians have created a new modeling toolkit which predicts the impact of COVID-19 at a local level with unprecedented accuracy.

  • Training helps teachers anticipate how students with learning disabilities might solve problems
    on July 12, 2021 at 4:20 pm

    Researchers found that a four-week training course made a substantial difference in helping special education teachers anticipate different ways students with learning disabilities might solve math problems.

  • Training helps teachers anticipate how students with learning disabilities might solve problems
    on July 12, 2021 at 4:20 pm

    Researchers found that a four-week training course made a substantial difference in helping special education teachers anticipate different ways students with learning disabilities might solve math problems.

  • For many students, double-dose algebra leads to college attainment
    on July 7, 2021 at 6:07 pm

    In the United States, low-income and minority students are completing college at low rates compared to higher-income and majority peers — a detriment to reducing economic inequality. Double-dose algebra could be a solution, according to a new study.

  • New study shows mathematical models helped reduce the spread of COVID-19
    on July 7, 2021 at 5:30 pm

    Researchers have published new findings that take a first look at the use of SARS-CoV-2 mathematical modeling to inform early statewide policies enacted to reduce the spread of the coronavirus pandemic in Colorado. Among other findings, the authors estimate that 97 percent of potential hospitalizations across the state in the early months of the pandemic were avoided as a result of social distancing and other transmission-reducing activities such as mask wearing and social isolation of symptomatic individuals.

  • Thinking in 3D improves mathematical skills
    on June 30, 2021 at 3:53 pm

    Spatial reasoning ability in small children reflects how well they will perform in mathematics later. Researchers recently came to this conclusion, making the case for better cultivation of spatial reasoning.

  • Thinking in 3D improves mathematical skills
    on June 30, 2021 at 3:53 pm

    Spatial reasoning ability in small children reflects how well they will perform in mathematics later. Researchers recently came to this conclusion, making the case for better cultivation of spatial reasoning.

  • When did the first COVID-19 case arise?
    on June 24, 2021 at 6:15 pm

    Using methods from conservation science, a new analysis suggests that the first case of COVID-19 arose between early October and mid-November, 2019 in China, with the most likely date of origin being November 17.

  • Lack of math education negatively affects adolescent brain and cognitive development
    on June 7, 2021 at 8:11 pm

    Adolescents who stopped studying math showed a reduction in a critical brain chemical for brain development. This reduction in brain chemical was found in a key brain area that supports math, memory, learning, reasoning and problem solving.

  • Applying mathematics takes ‘friendship paradox’ beyond averages
    on June 7, 2021 at 12:46 pm

    In network science, the famous ‘friendship paradox’ describes why your friends are (on average) more popular, richer, and more attractive than you are. But a slightly more nuanced picture emerges when we apply mathematics to real-world data.

  • Early warning system for COVID-19 gets faster through wastewater detection and tracing
    on June 4, 2021 at 5:54 pm

    A new research paper builds on previous research of COVID-19 testing in municipal sewer systems and subsequent tracing the virus back to the source by more accurately modelling a system’s treelike network of one-way pipes and manholes, and by speeding up the detection/tracing process through automatic sensors installed in specific manholes, chosen according to an easier-to-use algorithm.

  • Researchers explore ways to detect ‘deep fakes’ in geography
    on June 2, 2021 at 1:14 pm

    It may only be a matter of time until the growing problem of ‘deep fakes’ converges with geographical information science (GIS). A research team are doing what they can to get ahead of the problem.

  • Turbulence in interstellar gas clouds reveals multi-fractal structures
    on June 1, 2021 at 5:57 pm

    Astronomers describe the complex structure of the interstellar medium using a new mathematical method. The dispersion of interstellar turbulence in gas clouds before star formation unfolds in a cosmically small space.

  • Candy-like models used to make STEM accessible to visually impaired students
    on May 28, 2021 at 9:17 pm

    A breakthrough study aims to make science more accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired through small, candy-like models.

  • Mathematical model developed to prevent botulism
    on May 27, 2021 at 3:24 pm

    Food producers can use a mathematical model to ensure their products do not cause botulism.

  • Spacetime crystals proposed by placing space and time on an equal footing
    on May 27, 2021 at 3:24 pm

    A scientist studying crystal structures has developed a new mathematical formula that may solve a decades-old problem in understanding spacetime, the fabric of the universe proposed in Einstein’s theories of relativity.

  • Scientific software – Quality not always good
    on May 25, 2021 at 3:37 pm

    Computational tools are indispensable in almost all scientific disciplines. Especially in cases where large amounts of research data are generated and need to be quickly processed, reliable, carefully developed software is crucial for analyzing and correctly interpreting such data. Nevertheless, scientific software can have quality quality deficiencies. To evaluate software quality in an automated way, computer scientists have designed the SoftWipe tool.

  • Accurate evaluation of CRISPR genome editing
    on May 24, 2021 at 1:20 pm

    Researchers have developed a new software tool to detect, evaluate and quantify off-target editing activity, including adverse translocation events that can cause cancer. The software is based on input taken from a standard measurement assay, involving multiplexed PCR amplification and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS).

  • Will COVID-19 eventually become just a seasonal nuisance?
    on May 20, 2021 at 9:42 pm

    Within the next decade, the novel coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 could become little more than a nuisance, causing no more than common cold-like coughs and sniffles. That possible future is predicted by mathematical models that incorporate lessons learned from the current pandemic on how our body’s immunity changes over time.

  • These cognitive exercises help young children boost their math skills, study shows
    on May 20, 2021 at 5:37 pm

    Young children who practice visual working memory and reasoning tasks improve their math skills more than children who focus on spatial rotation exercises, according to a large study. The findings support the notion that training spatial cognition can enhance academic performance and that when it comes to math, the type of training matters.

  • These cognitive exercises help young children boost their math skills, study shows
    on May 20, 2021 at 5:37 pm

    Young children who practice visual working memory and reasoning tasks improve their math skills more than children who focus on spatial rotation exercises, according to a large study. The findings support the notion that training spatial cognition can enhance academic performance and that when it comes to math, the type of training matters.

  • Mathematical model predicts effect of bacterial mutations on antibiotic success
    on May 18, 2021 at 3:41 pm

    Scientists have developed a mathematical model that predicts how the number and effects of bacterial mutations leading to drug resistance will influence the success of antibiotic treatments.

  • Scientists map gene changes underlying brain and cognitive decline in aging
    on May 18, 2021 at 3:41 pm

    Alzheimer’s disease shares some key similarities with healthy aging, according to a new mathematical model.

  • Making AI algorithms show their work
    on May 13, 2021 at 6:24 pm

    Artificial intelligence (AI) learning machines can be trained to solve problems and puzzles on their own instead of using rules that we made for them. But often, researchers do not know what rules the machines make for themselves. A new method quizzes a machine-learning program to figure out what rules it learned on its own and if they are the right ones.

  • Universal equation for explosive phenomena
    on May 10, 2021 at 2:43 pm

    Climate change, a pandemic or the coordinated activity of neurons in the brain: In all of these examples, a transition takes place at a certain point from the base state to a new state. Researchers have discovered a universal mathematical structure at these so-called tipping points. It creates the basis for a better understanding of the behavior of networked systems.

  • Smartphone breath alcohol testing devices vary widely in accuracy
    on May 9, 2021 at 7:38 pm

    The latest generation of personal alcohol breath testing devices pair with smartphones. While some of these devices were found to be relatively accurate, others may mislead users into thinking that they are fit to drive, according to a new study.

  • Quantum drum duet measured
    on May 6, 2021 at 6:20 pm

    Like conductors of a spooky symphony, researchers have ‘entangled’ two small mechanical drums and precisely measured their linked quantum properties. Entangled pairs like this might someday perform computations and transmit data in large-scale quantum networks.

  • Open source tool can help identify gerrymandering in voting maps
    on May 6, 2021 at 2:54 pm

    Researchers describe the improved mathematical methodology of an open source tool called Gerrychain, which can help observers detect gerrymandering in a voting district plan by creating an ensemble of alternate maps that also meet legal voting criteria.

  • Algorithms improve how we protect our data
    on May 4, 2021 at 3:26 pm

    Scientists have developed algorithms that more efficiently measure how difficult it would be for an attacker to guess secret keys for cryptographic systems. The approach could reduce the computational complexity needed to validate encryption security.

  • Finding the optimal way to repay student debt
    on April 29, 2021 at 4:33 pm

    Though legislative reform is necessary to combat the growing burden of student loan debt in the U.S. on a grand scale, individual borrowers can take steps to repay their loans with as low long-term costs as possible. A new mathematical model develops a strategy for minimizing the overall cost of repaying student loans.

  • New computer model helps brings the sun into the laboratory
    on April 28, 2021 at 5:55 pm

    Every day, the sun ejects large amounts of a hot particle soup known as plasma toward Earth where it can disrupt telecommunications satellites and damage electrical grids. Now, scientists have made a discovery that could lead to better predictions of this space weather and help safeguard sensitive infrastructure.

  • Silicon could be a photonics game-changer
    on April 27, 2021 at 5:55 pm

    New research has shown that silicon could be one of the most powerful materials for photonic informational manipulation – opening up new possibilities for the production of lasers and displays.

  • Simple robots, smart algorithms
    on April 24, 2021 at 1:07 am

    Inspired by a theoretical model of particles moving around on a chessboard, new robot swarm research shows that, as magnetic interactions increase, dispersed ‘dumb robots’ can abruptly gather in large, compact clusters to accomplish complex tasks. Researchers report that these ‘BOBbots’ (behaving, organizing, buzzing bots) are also capable of collectively clearing debris that is too heavy for one alone to move, thanks to a robust algorithm.

  • Simple robots, smart algorithms
    on April 24, 2021 at 1:07 am

    Inspired by a theoretical model of particles moving around on a chessboard, new robot swarm research shows that, as magnetic interactions increase, dispersed ‘dumb robots’ can abruptly gather in large, compact clusters to accomplish complex tasks. Researchers report that these ‘BOBbots’ (behaving, organizing, buzzing bots) are also capable of collectively clearing debris that is too heavy for one alone to move, thanks to a robust algorithm.

  • Designing healthy diets with computer analysis
    on April 20, 2021 at 10:31 pm

    A new mathematical model for the interaction of bacteria in the gut could help design new probiotics and specially tailored diets to prevent diseases.

  • Research breakthrough in understanding how neural systems process and store information
    on April 14, 2021 at 7:49 pm

    Scientists have made a breakthrough in the quest to better understand how neural systems are able to process and store information.

  • Auxin makes the spirals in gerbera inflorescences follow the Fibonacci sequence
    on April 14, 2021 at 3:34 pm

    The meristem of the gerbera is patterned on the molecular level already at a stage where no primordia or other changes are discernible by even an electron microscope.

  • Auxin makes the spirals in gerbera inflorescences follow the Fibonacci sequence
    on April 14, 2021 at 3:34 pm

    The meristem of the gerbera is patterned on the molecular level already at a stage where no primordia or other changes are discernible by even an electron microscope.

  • Machine learning can help slow down future pandemics
    on April 13, 2021 at 3:41 pm

    Artificial intelligence could be one of the keys for limiting the spread of infection in future pandemics. In a new study, researchers have investigated how machine learning can be used to find effective testing methods during epidemic outbreaks, thereby helping to better control the outbreaks.

  • New approach to centuries-old ‘three-body problem’
    on April 13, 2021 at 3:41 pm

    The “three-body problem,” the term coined for predicting the motion of three gravitating bodies in space, is essential for understanding a variety of astrophysical processes as well as a large class of mechanical problems, and has occupied some of the world’s best physicists, astronomers and mathematicians for over three centuries. Their attempts have led to the discovery of several important fields of science; yet its solution remained a mystery.

  • New approach to centuries-old ‘three-body problem’
    on April 13, 2021 at 3:41 pm

    The “three-body problem,” the term coined for predicting the motion of three gravitating bodies in space, is essential for understanding a variety of astrophysical processes as well as a large class of mechanical problems, and has occupied some of the world’s best physicists, astronomers and mathematicians for over three centuries. Their attempts have led to the discovery of several important fields of science; yet its solution remained a mystery.

  • Basketball Mathematics scores big at inspiring kids to learn
    on April 13, 2021 at 12:14 pm

    New study with 756 1st through 5th graders demonstrates that a six-week mashup of hoops and math has a positive effect on their desire to learn more, provides them with an experience of increased self-determination and grows math confidence among youth.

  • Basketball Mathematics scores big at inspiring kids to learn
    on April 13, 2021 at 12:14 pm

    New study with 756 1st through 5th graders demonstrates that a six-week mashup of hoops and math has a positive effect on their desire to learn more, provides them with an experience of increased self-determination and grows math confidence among youth.

  • Do school-based interventions help improve reading and math in at-risk children?
    on April 7, 2021 at 12:36 pm

    School-based interventions that target students with, or at risk of, academic difficulties in kindergarten to grade 6 have positive effects on reading and mathematics, according to a new article.

  • Do school-based interventions help improve reading and math in at-risk children?
    on April 7, 2021 at 12:36 pm

    School-based interventions that target students with, or at risk of, academic difficulties in kindergarten to grade 6 have positive effects on reading and mathematics, according to a new article.

  • Understanding fruit fly behavior may be next step toward autonomous vehicles
    on April 6, 2021 at 5:19 pm

    With over 70% of respondents to a AAA annual survey on autonomous driving reporting they would fear being in a fully self-driving car, makers like Tesla may be back to the drawing board before rolling out fully autonomous self-driving systems. But new research shows us we may be better off putting fruit flies behind the wheel instead of robots.

  • Big data tells story of diversity, migration of math’s elite
    on March 30, 2021 at 4:13 pm

    Research uses artificial intelligence to map connections between the world’s top mathematicians.

  • New statistical method eases data reproducibility crisis
    on March 30, 2021 at 12:12 pm

    A reproducibility crisis is ongoing in scientific research, where many studies may be difficult or impossible to replicate and thereby validate, especially when the study involves a very large sample size. Now researchers have developed a statistical tool that can accurately estimate the replicability of a study, thus eliminating the need to duplicate the work and effectively mitigating the reproducibility crisis.

  • Standard vital signs could help estimate people’s pain levels
    on March 11, 2021 at 8:27 pm

    A new study demonstrates that machine-learning strategies can be applied to routinely collected physiological data, such as heart rate and blood pressure, to provide clues about pain levels in people with sickle cell disease.

  • Sum of cubes: New math solution for 3
    on March 11, 2021 at 7:22 pm

    After cracking the ‘sum of cubes’ puzzle for 42, mathematicians discover a new solution for 3.

  • In era of online learning, new testing method aims to reduce cheating
    on March 1, 2021 at 6:38 pm

    Engineers demonstrate how a testing strategy they call ‘distanced online testing’ can effectively reduce students’ ability to receive help from one another in order to score higher on a test taken at individual homes during social distancing.

  • Laser system generates random numbers at ultrafast speeds
    on February 25, 2021 at 7:37 pm

    Scientists have developed a system that can generate random numbers over a hundred times faster than current technologies, paving the way towards faster, cheaper, and more secure data encryption in today’s digitally connected world.

  • AI identifies social bias trends in Bollywood, Hollywood movies
    on February 25, 2021 at 4:32 pm

    An automated computer analysis method designed by Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists makes it possible to track social biases across decades of Bollywood and Hollywood movies.

  • The Ramanujan Machine: Researchers develop ‘conjecture generator’
    on February 5, 2021 at 3:42 pm

    Using AI and computer automation, researchers have developed a ‘conjecture generator’ that creates mathematical conjectures, which are considered to be the starting point for developing mathematical theorems.

  • To find the right network model, compare all possible histories
    on January 27, 2021 at 1:52 pm

    Scientists rarely have the historical data they need to see exactly how nodes in a network became connected. But a new article offers hope for reconstructing the missing information, using a new method to evaluate the rules that generate network models.

  • Researchers use deep learning to identify gene regulation at single-cell level
    on January 13, 2021 at 2:09 pm

    Researchers describe how they developed a deep-learning framework to observe gene regulation at the cellular level.

  • Traditional model for disease spread may not work in COVID-19
    on December 21, 2020 at 6:42 pm

    A mathematical model that can help project the contagiousness and spread of infectious diseases like the seasonal flu may not be the best way to predict the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus, especially during lockdowns that alter the normal mix of the population.

  • To the brain, reading computer code is not the same as reading language
    on December 15, 2020 at 6:12 pm

    Neuroscientists have found reading computer code does not rely on the regions of the brain involved in language processing. Instead, it activates the ‘multiple demand network,’ which is also recruited for complex cognitive tasks such as solving math problems or crossword puzzles.

  • Like adults, children by age 3 prefer seeing fractal patterns
    on December 11, 2020 at 6:55 pm

    By the time children are 3 years old they already have an adult-like preference for visual fractal patterns commonly seen in nature, according to researchers.

  • New computational method validates images without ‘ground truth’
    on December 11, 2020 at 4:55 pm

    Researchers have developed a computational method that allows them to determine not if an entire imaging picture is accurate, but if any given point on the image is probable, based on the assumptions built into the model.

  • Quantum magic squares
    on November 24, 2020 at 5:29 pm

    The magic of mathematics is particularly reflected in magic squares. Recently, quantum physicists and mathematicians introduced the notion of the quantum magic square, and for the first time studied in detail the properties of this quantum version of magic squares.

  • A biochemical random number
    on November 20, 2020 at 4:38 pm

    Scientists have generated a huge true random number using DNA synthesis. It is the first time that a number of this magnitude has been created by biochemical means.

  • Computer scientists launch counteroffensive against video game cheaters
    on November 16, 2020 at 5:56 pm

    Computer scientists have devised a new weapon against video game players who cheat. The researchers developed their approach for detecting cheaters using the popular first-person shooter game Counter-Strike. But the mechanism can work for any massively multiplayer online (MMO) game that sends data traffic to a central server.

  • COVID-19 ‘super-spreading’ events play outsized role in overall disease transmission
    on November 2, 2020 at 10:32 pm

    Researchers find COVID-19 super-spreading events, in which one person infects more than six other people, are much more frequent than anticipated, and that they have an outsized contribution to coronavirus transmission.

  • Random effects key to containing epidemics
    on October 27, 2020 at 3:12 pm

    Scientists have discovered why dividing a large population into multiple subpopulations that do not intermix can help contain outbreaks without imposing contact restrictions within those local communities.

  • Researchers discover a uniquely quantum effect in erasing information
    on October 16, 2020 at 2:09 pm

    Researchers have discovered a uniquely quantum effect in erasing information that may have significant implications for the design of quantum computing chips. Their surprising discovery brings back to life the paradoxical ‘Maxwell’s demo’, which has tormented physicists for over 150 years.

  • Researchers use artificial intelligence language tools to decode molecular movements
    on October 9, 2020 at 12:49 pm

    Researchers used language processing AI to turn molecular movements into stories that reveal what forms a protein can take and how and when it changes form — key information for understanding disease and developing targeted therapeutics.

  • Mathematical modelling to prevent fistulas
    on September 17, 2020 at 2:53 pm

    It is better to invest in measures that make it easier for women to visit a doctor during pregnancy than measures to repair birth injuries. This is the conclusion from mathematicians, using Uganda as an example.

  • A new method for directed networks could help multiple levels of science
    on September 9, 2020 at 12:05 am

    Researchers reveal a new method for analyzing hierarchies in complex networks and illustrate it by applications to economics, language and gene expression.

  • The mathematical values of Linear A fraction signs
    on September 8, 2020 at 3:32 pm

    A recent study has shed new light on the Minoan system of fractions, one of the outstanding enigmas tied to the ancient writing of numbers.

  • Battery-free Game Boy runs forever
    on September 3, 2020 at 9:14 pm

    Researchers develop first-ever battery-free, energy-harvesting, interactive device. And it looks and feels like a retro 8-bit Nintendo Game Boy.

  • New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
    on September 3, 2020 at 2:56 pm

    A researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. A new article outlines the technique he developed and shows how shifting monsoon patterns led to the demise of the Indus Valley Civilization, a Bronze Age civilization contemporary to Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt.

  • Revolutionary quantum breakthrough paves way for safer online communication
    on September 2, 2020 at 7:21 pm

    The world is one step closer to having a totally secure internet and an answer to the growing threat of cyber-attacks, thanks to a team of international scientists who have created a unique prototype which could transform how we communicate online.

  • Using math to examine the sex differences in dinosaurs
    on August 27, 2020 at 12:07 am

    When you only have fossils to go off of, it’s hard to tell which dinosaur traits, like size and ornamentation, are related to the animals’ sex, and which traits are related to other things like age. But a new kind of statistical analysis can often estimate the degree of sexual variation in a dataset of fossils.

  • Thermodynamics of computation: A quest to find the cost of running a Turing machine
    on August 26, 2020 at 9:56 pm

    Turing machines are widely believed to be universal, in the sense that any computation done by any system can also be done by a Turing machine. In a new article, researchers present their work exploring the energetic costs of computation within the context of Turing machines.

  • Fifty new planets confirmed in machine learning first
    on August 25, 2020 at 3:06 pm

    Fifty potential planets have had their existence confirmed by a new machine learning algorithm.

  • Skat and poker: More luck than skill?
    on August 21, 2020 at 2:38 pm

    Chess requires playing ability and strategic thinking; in roulette, chance determines victory or defeat, gain or loss. But what about skat and poker? Are they games of chance or games of skill in game theory? This classification also determines whether play may involve money. Economists have studied this question and developed a rating system similar to the Elo system used for chess.

  • Brain-NET, a deep learning methodology, accurately predicts surgeon certification scores based on neuroimaging data
    on August 11, 2020 at 4:50 pm

    Researchers demonstrated how a deep learning framework they call ‘Brain-NET’ can accurately predict a person’s level of expertise in terms of their surgical motor skills, based solely on neuroimaging data.

  • Language may undermine women in science and tech
    on August 3, 2020 at 4:01 pm

    Researchers examined gender stereotypes baked into 25 languages to explore why fewer women enter science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

  • Randomness theory could hold key to internet security
    on July 27, 2020 at 11:47 pm

    Researchers identified a problem that holds the key to whether all encryption can be broken — as well as a surprising connection to a mathematical concept that aims to define and measure randomness.

  • More realistic computer graphics
    on July 24, 2020 at 6:10 pm

    New software techniques make lighting in computer-generated images look more realistic for use in video games, extended reality, and scientific visualization tools.

  • Links between video games and gambling run deeper than previously thought, study reveals
    on July 14, 2020 at 2:12 pm

    A new study suggests that a number of practices in video games, such as token wagering, real-money gaming, and social casino spending, are significantly linked to problem gambling.

  • Consumers prefer round numbers even when the specific number is better news
    on July 6, 2020 at 6:08 pm

    Consider this scenario: A vaccine for the novel coronavirus has been developed that is 91.27% effective. If public health officials present this information using the specific number, people are likely to think the vaccine is actually less effective than if it is presented as being 90% effective. This concept is a real-life application of recent findings from Gaurav Jain, an assistant professor of marketing in the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, published recently in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Process.

  • Smokers good at math are more likely to want to quit
    on June 22, 2020 at 1:50 pm

    For smokers who are better at math, the decision to quit just adds up, a new study suggests. Researchers found that smokers who scored higher on a test of math ability were more likely than others to say they intended to quit smoking.

  • Achievement isn’t why more men are majoring in physics, engineering and computer science
    on June 18, 2020 at 7:02 pm

    Researchers have found that the reason there are more undergraduate men than women majoring in physics, engineering and computer science is not because men are higher achievers. On the contrary, the scholars found that men with very low high-school GPAs in math and science and very low SAT math scores were choosing these math-intensive majors just as often as women with much higher math and science achievement.

  • What do ‘Bohemian Rhapsody,’ ‘Macbeth,’ and a list of Facebook friends all have in common?
    on June 16, 2020 at 5:57 pm

    A new study shows how vastly complex communication networks can efficiently convey large amounts of information to the human brain. Researcher found that works of literature, musical pieces, and social networks have a similar underlying structure that allows them to share information rapidly and effectively.

  • AI sentencing tools need to be closely scrutinized
    on June 9, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    Judges should closely vet the AI tools they use to help them predict whether a defendant is likely to re offend, urges a new study.

  • Limits on evolution revealed by statistical physics
    on May 29, 2020 at 7:06 pm

    What is and is not possible for natural evolution may be explained using models and calculations from theoretical physics, say researchers. To explain this the limits of evolution, researchers simplified the natural world to fit idealized physics models and searched for any mathematical structure within biological complexity.

  • Solution to century-old math problem could predict transmission of infectious diseases
    on May 29, 2020 at 7:06 pm

    An academic has achieved a milestone in statistical/mathematical physics by solving a 100-year-old physics problem — the discrete diffusion equation in finite space.

  • New model predicts the peaks of the COVID-19 pandemic
    on May 29, 2020 at 7:06 pm

    Researchers describe a single function that accurately describes all existing available data on active COVID-19 cases and deaths — and predicts forthcoming peaks.

  • High variability is result of complex data workflows
    on May 20, 2020 at 11:12 pm

    A new study offers new evidence that the complexity of contemporary analytical methods in science contributes to the variability of research outcomes.

  • New study estimates the odds of life and intelligence emerging beyond our planet
    on May 18, 2020 at 8:26 pm

    Despite knowing when life first appeared on Earth, scientists still do not understand how life occurred, which has important implications for the likelihood of finding life elsewhere in the universe. A new paper shows how an analysis using a statistical technique called Bayesian inference could shed light on how complex extraterrestrial life might evolve in alien worlds.

  • Is video game addiction real?
    on May 13, 2020 at 6:38 pm

    A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. A significant minority, though, can become truly addicted to video games and as a result can suffer mentally, socially and behaviorally.

  • Identifying light sources using artificial intelligence
    on May 5, 2020 at 4:16 pm

    Identifying sources of light plays an important role in the development of many photonic technologies, such as lidar, remote sensing, and microscopy. Traditionally, identifying light sources as diverse as sunlight, laser radiation, or molecule fluorescence has required millions of measurements, particularly in low-light environments, which limits the realistic implementation of quantum photonic technologies. Researchers demonstrated a smart quantum technology that enables a dramatic reduction in the number of measurements required to identify light sources.

  • Identifying light sources using artificial intelligence
    on May 5, 2020 at 4:16 pm

    Identifying sources of light plays an important role in the development of many photonic technologies, such as lidar, remote sensing, and microscopy. Traditionally, identifying light sources as diverse as sunlight, laser radiation, or molecule fluorescence has required millions of measurements, particularly in low-light environments, which limits the realistic implementation of quantum photonic technologies. Researchers demonstrated a smart quantum technology that enables a dramatic reduction in the number of measurements required to identify light sources.

  • What is an individual? Information Theory may provide the answer
    on April 16, 2020 at 1:19 pm

    Despite the near-universal assumption of individuality in biology, there is little agreement about what individuals are and few rigorous quantitative methods for their identification. A new approach may solve the problem by defining individuals in terms of informational processes.

  • Psychiatry: Five clearly defined patterns
    on February 25, 2020 at 3:50 pm

    Psychiatrists have used a computer-based approach to assign psychotic patients diagnosed as bipolar or schizophrenic to five different subgroups. The method could lead to better therapies for psychoses.

  • New artificial intelligence algorithm better predicts corn yield
    on February 20, 2020 at 6:05 pm

    With some reports predicting the precision agriculture market will reach $12.9 billion by 2027, there is an increasing need to develop sophisticated data-analysis solutions that can guide management decisions in real time. A new study offers a promising approach to efficiently and accurately process precision agricultural data.

  • Mixed-signal hardware security thwarts powerful electromagnetic attacks
    on February 19, 2020 at 2:25 pm

    A team has developed technology to use mixed-signal circuits to embed critical information that is suppressed at a lower level.

  • Storytelling can reduce VR cybersickness
    on February 13, 2020 at 2:07 pm

    A storyline with emotionally evocative details can reduce virtual reality cybersickness for some people, according to a new study. Researchers found that storylines that provide context and details can help users feel immersed in VR experiences and can reduce feelings of nausea, disorientation and eye strain, depending on a user’s gaming experience.

  • Apps could take up less space on your phone, thanks to new ‘streaming’ software
    on February 6, 2020 at 11:43 pm

    New software ‘streams’ data and code resources to an app from a cloud server when necessary, allowing the app to use only the space it needs on a phone at any given time.

  • Enjoying the View? How computer games can help evaluate landscapes
    on February 6, 2020 at 6:23 pm

    Geographers are stepping into the virtual world of computer games to develop exciting new ways of assessing landscapes. Researchers have spent years analyzing geographical landscapes and determining what features people from different countries find most appealing. In a bid to engage younger audiences the team created a series of videos depicting dynamic fly-throughs of virtual landscapes.

  • Supercomputers help link quantum entanglement to cold coffee
    on January 31, 2020 at 5:56 pm

    Theoretical physicists have found a deep link between one of the most striking features of quantum mechanics — quantum entanglement — and thermalization, which is the process in which something comes into thermal equilibrium with its surroundings.

  • First all-optical, stealth encryption technology developed
    on January 29, 2020 at 2:14 pm

    Engineers are introducing the first all-optical “stealth” encryption technology that will be significantly more secure and private for highly sensitive cloud-computing and data center network transmission.

  • How human social structures emerge
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:30 pm

    What rules shaped humanity’s original social networks? The earliest social networks were tightly knit cultural groups made of multiple biologically related families. That single group would then develop relationships with other cultural groups in their local area. Researchers used statistical physics and computer models common in evolutionary biology to explain the origin of common community structures documented by cultural anthropologists around the world.

  • Nearly 9 in 10 parents say teens spend too much time gaming
    on January 20, 2020 at 4:34 pm

    Eighty-six percent of parents agree that teens spend too much time gaming, but many may be mistaken about the extent of their own child’s video game habits, a new national poll suggests.

  • Mathematicians put famous Battle of Britain ‘what if’ scenarios to the test
    on January 9, 2020 at 6:02 pm

    Mathematicians have developed a new model to explore what the impact of changes to Luftwaffe tactics would actually have been. Their approach uses statistical modelling to calculate how the Battle might have played out if history had followed one of several alternative courses.

  • Indeterminist physics for an open world
    on January 7, 2020 at 3:49 pm

    Classical physics is characterized by the equations describing the world. Yet our day-to-day experience is struck by this deterministic vision of the world. A physicist has been analyzing the classical mathematical language used in modern physics. He has thrown light on a contradiction between the equations that explained the phenomena and the finite world. He suggests making changes to the mathematical language to allow randomness and indeterminism to become part of classical physics.

  • An algorithm for large-scale genomic analysis
    on December 20, 2019 at 3:56 pm

    The examination of Haplotypes makes it possible to understand the heritability of certain complex traits. However, genome analysis of family members is usually necessary, a tedious and expensive process. Researchers have developed SHAPEIT4, a powerful computer algorithm that allows the haplotypes of hundreds of thousands of unrelated individuals to be identified very quickly. Results are as detailed as when family analysis is performed. Their tool is available online under an open source license.

  • Smaller class sizes not always better for pupils, multinational study shows
    on December 16, 2019 at 1:11 am

    A new statistical analysis of data from a long-term study on the teaching of mathematics and science has found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement.

  • Computer game may help to predict reuse of opioids
    on December 8, 2019 at 2:21 pm

    A computer betting game can help predict the likelihood that someone recovering from opioid addiction will reuse the pain-relieving drugs, a new study shows.

  • Deep learning to analyze neurological problems
    on November 21, 2019 at 7:13 pm

    Getting to the doctor’s office for a check-up can be challenging for someone with a neurological disorder that impairs their movement, such as a stroke. But what if the patient could just take a video clip of their movements with a smart phone and forward the results to their doctor?

  • Brains of girls and boys are similar, producing equal math ability
    on November 8, 2019 at 12:48 pm

    New research comprehensively examined the brain development of young boys and girls. Their research shows no gender difference in brain function or math ability.

  • In classical and quantum secure communication practical randomness is incomplete
    on November 4, 2019 at 4:28 pm

    Random bit sequences are key ingredients of various tasks in modern life and especially in secure communication. In a new study researchers have determined that generating true random bit sequences, classical or quantum, is an impossible mission. Based on these findings, they have demonstrated a new method of classified secure communication.

  • Escapism: A powerful predictor of internet gaming disorder among video gamers
    on October 22, 2019 at 4:11 pm

    A new study is the first to compare professional electronic sport (esport) players with recreational video game players and explores the similarities and differences between what motivates each group. While the two groups are psychosocially different, they found that both esport and recreational gamers run the risk of developing internet gaming disorder when their intense immersion in the activity is tied to escapism.

  • New CRISPR genome editing system offers a wide range of versatility in human cells
    on October 21, 2019 at 4:45 pm

    A team has developed a new CRISPR genome-editing approach by combining two of the most important proteins in molecular biology — CRISPR-Cas9 and a reverse transcriptase — into a single machine.

  • Prevention better than cure at preventing young users from getting involved in cybercrime
    on October 21, 2019 at 12:27 pm

    Highly-targeted messaging campaigns from law enforcement can be surprisingly effective at dissuading young gamers from getting involved in cybercrime, a new study has suggested.

  • Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries
    on October 17, 2019 at 11:55 am

    During Earth’s last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. A new article suggests that mathematics from information theory could offer a powerful tool for analyzing and understanding these mysterious events.

  • Combination of techniques could improve security for IoT devices
    on October 10, 2019 at 8:48 pm

    A multi-pronged data analysis approach that can strengthen the security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices — such as smart TVs, home video cameras and baby monitors — against current risks and threats has been created.

  • Addictive de-vices: How we can unplug from this 21st century epidemic
    on October 3, 2019 at 1:20 pm

    We spend our days looking at them, talking to them, and touching them. They increasingly consume our time, attention and money. We are addicted to our digital devices — or, more precisely, the digital experiences they give us. A study analyzed the growing problem with digital addiction and how marketers as well as app developers contribute to this 21st-century phenomenon.

  • New research analyzes video game player engagement
    on September 25, 2019 at 5:36 pm

    In the video game industry, the ability for gaming companies to track and respond to gamers’ post-purchase play opens up new opportunities to enhance gamer engagement and retention and increase video game revenue.

  • Scientists one step closer to a fully functioning quantum computer
    on September 25, 2019 at 5:13 pm

    Quantum computing has the potential to revolutionize technology, medicine, and science by providing faster and more efficient processors, sensors, and communication devices. But transferring information and correcting errors within a quantum system remains a challenge. Researchers now demonstrate a new method of relaying information by transferring the state of electrons. The research brings scientists one step closer to creating fully functional quantum computers.

  • Better way to teach physics to university students
    on September 25, 2019 at 4:04 pm

    Physicists and educators have developed a curriculum for college-level students that shows promise in helping students in introductory physics classes further practice and develop their calculus skills.

  • Artificial intelligence probes dark matter in the universe
    on September 18, 2019 at 2:02 pm

    Physicists and computer scientists have developed a new approach to the problem of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. Using machine learning tools, they programmed computers to teach themselves how to extract the relevant information from maps of the universe.

  • Research advances noise cancelling for quantum computers
    on September 16, 2019 at 12:14 pm

    The characterization of complex noise in quantum computers is a critical step toward making the systems more precise.

  • African American bachelor’s degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering
    on September 12, 2019 at 5:44 pm

    African Americans are seeing growth in engineering and physical sciences but are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population. A report examined the number of bachelor’s degrees earned from 2005 to 2015.

  • African American bachelor’s degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering
    on September 12, 2019 at 5:44 pm

    African Americans are seeing growth in engineering and physical sciences but are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population. A report examined the number of bachelor’s degrees earned from 2005 to 2015.

  • Good at math? It means little if you’re not confident
    on September 9, 2019 at 7:42 pm

    Being good at math relates to better financial and medical outcomes — unless you don’t have confidence in your own abilities with numbers, new research suggests. In two studies, researchers found that the key to success in personal finances and dealing with a complex disease was a match between a person’s math abilities and how comfortable and assured he or she felt using those skills.

  • The ever-winning lottery ticket: Mathematicians solve a dusty mystery
    on September 9, 2019 at 2:45 pm

    After years of work, mathematics researchers have answered a mysterious half-century-old riddle. The mystery was all but forgotten until a Danish researcher heard about, and then decided to tackle it.

  • Sum of three cubes for 42 finally solved — using real life planetary computer
    on September 6, 2019 at 5:40 pm

    Hot on the heels of the ground-breaking ‘Sum-Of-Three-Cubes’ solution for the number 33, mathematicians have solved the final piece of the famous 65-year-old math puzzle with an answer for the most elusive number of all – 42.

  • Personality and motivation in relation to internet gaming disorder
    on September 5, 2019 at 12:00 pm

    A new study examining the relationships among personality, motivation, and internet gaming disorder (IGD) found that predictors of IGD include male gender, neurotic and introverted personality traits, and motivation related to achievement.

  • Customers feel more accomplished when progress tracked in round numbers
    on August 21, 2019 at 1:59 pm

    The study shows reaching a goal expressed in round numbers results in higher levels of customer satisfaction. That was particularly true when the final goal was still distant. Hitting intermediate targets expressed as round numbers increased customers’ feeling of progress at low levels of achievement.

  • We like our math like we like our art: Beautiful
    on August 9, 2019 at 7:59 pm

    A beautiful landscape painting, a beautiful piano sonata — art and music are almost exclusively described in terms of aesthetics, but what about math? Beyond useful or brilliant, can an abstract idea be considered beautiful?

  • Mathematicians develop new statistical indicator
    on August 9, 2019 at 3:30 pm

    Up to now, it has taken a great deal of computational effort to detect dependencies between more than two high-dimensional variables, in particular when complicated non-linear relationships are involved. Mathematicians have now developed a dependence measure called ‘distance multivariance’.

  • Top tools for pinpointing genetic drivers of disease
    on July 25, 2019 at 2:04 pm

    A new benchmarking study has determined the best analysis tools for identifying errors in a patient’s DNA that are responsible for driving disease. Being able to pinpoint these ‘genomic rearrangements’ is vital for understanding how illnesses occur, and therefore, how best to treat them.

  • Myth-busting study reveals that gamblers can’t detect slot machine payout percentages
    on July 15, 2019 at 8:16 pm

    It’s a common sight on casino floors: patrons jumping from slot machine to slot machine before eventually hunkering down at a game that’s due for the next big payout. But can players — even the regulars who frequent a particular property — really tell the difference between the house edge on one game from that of another? Nope. At least not according to a series of recent studies led by a college professor and former gaming industry operations analyst.

  • Deep learning-powered ‘DeepEC’ helps accurately understand enzyme functions
    on July 9, 2019 at 3:02 pm

    Researchers have shown that a deep learning-powered computational framework enables the high-quality and high-throughput prediction of enzyme commission numbers, which is essential for the accurate understanding of enzyme functions.

  • Want to boost creativity? Try playing Minecraft
    on July 8, 2019 at 6:00 pm

    Video games that foster creative freedom can increase creativity under certain conditions, according to new research. The experimental study compared the effect of playing Minecraft, with or without instruction, to watching a TV show or playing a race car video game. Those given the freedom to play Minecraft without instruction were most creative.

  • Play games with no latency
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:10 pm

    One of the most challenging issues for game players looks to be resolved soon with the introduction of a zero-latency gaming environment. A team has now developed technology that helps game players maintain zero-latency performance. The new technology transforms the shapes of game design according to the amount of latency.